Development of Highly Efficient Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Novel Light Emission Mechanism

August 11,2015

Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display technology is a rapidly growing area with market applications covering cell phones, flat panel TVs, and lighting. Developing a novel emitter system is a research project being conducted in collaboration with Kyung Hee University in Korea. It will enable the manufacture of large flat panel displays with better device efficiency at lower materials cost.

Q1. What is your view on future growth opportunities for OLED market?

New OLED emitter research will continue to bring enhanced performance to drive the OLED display market. OLED display technology is a rapidly growing area, and has great potential for various applications in many display areas. Currently, more than 90% of OLED panels are used in mobile phone applications. However, these OLED panels will be used not only for large flat panel TVs, but also for flexible displays, wearable displays, wallpaper displays, automobile displays, and lighting. There is no limitation on developing OLED panels, which is why the market for OLED panels will gradually be expanded. These opportunities can be realized through collective efforts from both display panel companies and material suppliers such as Dow.

Q2. What is the primary objective of your research?

Our research with Kyung Hee University is focused on discovering and developing a novel type of emitting materials that have a unique mechanism of light emission, different from conventional emitting systems. The research will enable display panel companies to produce higher performance OLED panels with a lower production cost, when compared to current commercial materials. There are many technical issues to solve in order to develop this novel emitter system. The primary objective of our collaboration is to identify the key challenges of this new emitting system and explore solutions to those issues through a repeating process of computer modeling, design and synthesis of candidates, and device evaluation. Moreover, we are working with Dow Core R&D, which has strong R&D capabilities as well as high-tech equipment to develop this technology.

Q3. What will the impact of your research be?

Once this work is complete, Dow could provide an integrated solution of OLED. As mentioned above, this technology will enable the manufacture of large flat panel displays or lighting elements with better device efficiency and lifetime at a lower materials cost and capital investment, thereby feeding the growth of OLED market with diverse applications.

In addition, through this industrial-academic cooperation we anticipate great synergy from the exchange of ideas between Dow and Kyung Hee University, gaining further insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms of OLED materials.

Q4. What has the partnership achieved so far in 2015?

Computer modeling is an indispensable tool in predicting and selecting potential compounds, but the simulation could be misleading if proper parameters are not applied. Through many rounds of calculation using different sets of parameters, we successfully came up with a reliable and consistent computer modeling method that is now routinely used in this study. It was found to be comparable to the value from real measurements of energy structures and bulk properties.

In this novel type of emission, many factors contribute to overall performance of the device. In fact, we have been able to identify the key aspect that plays a critical role in enhancing device efficiency. This requirement was quantified by preparing OLED devices with many sets of compounds, and it showed an excellent correlation within the series of compounds tested up to now.

With reliable modeling tools and key parameters having been identified, we are set to complete the study of device optimization with candidate compounds and their analogues. The key point will be device performance that is not only comparable to conventional emitting systems, but also has other advantages such as lower material cost, IP initiative, etc.New OLED emitter research will continue to bring enhanced performance to drive the OLED display market. OLED display technology is a rapidly growing area, and has great potential for various applications in many display areas. Currently, more than 90% of OLED panels are used in mobile phone applications. However, these OLED panels will be used not only for large flat panel TVs, but also for flexible displays, wearable displays, wallpaper displays, automobile displays, and lighting. There is no limitation on developing OLED panels, which is why the market for OLED panels will gradually be expanded. These opportunities can be realized through collective efforts from both display panel companies and material suppliers such as Dow.

Q2. What is the primary objective of your research?

Our research with Kyung Hee University is focused on discovering and developing a novel type of emitting materials that have a unique mechanism of light emission, different from conventional emitting systems. The research will enable display panel companies to produce higher performance OLED panels with a lower production cost, when compared to current commercial materials. There are many technical issues to solve in order to develop this novel emitter system. The primary objective of our collaboration is to identify the key challenges of this new emitting system and explore solutions to those issues through a repeating process of computer modeling, design and synthesis of candidates, and device evaluation. Moreover, we are working with Dow Core R&D, which has strong R&D capabilities as well as high-tech equipment to develop this technology.

Q3. What will the impact of your research be?

Once this work is complete, Dow could provide an integrated solution of OLED. As mentioned above, this technology will enable the manufacture of large flat panel displays or lighting elements with better device efficiency and lifetime at a lower materials cost and capital investment, thereby feeding the growth of OLED market with diverse applications.

In addition, through this industrial-academic cooperation we anticipate great synergy from the exchange of ideas between Dow and Kyung Hee University, gaining further insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms of OLED materials.

Q4. What has the partnership achieved so far in 2015?

Computer modeling is an indispensable tool in predicting and selecting potential compounds, but the simulation could be misleading if proper parameters are not applied. Through many rounds of calculation using different sets of parameters, we successfully came up with a reliable and consistent computer modeling method that is now routinely used in this study. It was found to be comparable to the value from real measurements of energy structures and bulk properties.

In this novel type of emission, many factors contribute to overall performance of the device. In fact, we have been able to identify the key aspect that plays a critical role in enhancing device efficiency. This requirement was quantified by preparing OLED devices with many sets of compounds, and it showed an excellent correlation within the series of compounds tested up to now.

With reliable modeling tools and key parameters having been identified, we are set to complete the study of device optimization with candidate compounds and their analogues. The key point will be device performance that is not only comparable to conventional emitting systems, but also has other advantages such as lower material cost, IP initiative, etc.

New OLED emitter research will continue to bring enhanced performance to drive the OLED display market. OLED display technology is a rapidly growing area, and has great potential for various applications in many display areas. Currently, more than 90% of OLED panels are used in mobile phone applications. However, these OLED panels will be used not only for large flat panel TVs, but also for flexible displays, wearable displays, wallpaper displays, automobile displays, and lighting. There is no limitation on developing OLED panels, which is why the market for OLED panels will gradually be expanded. These opportunities can be realized through collective efforts from both display panel companies and material suppliers such as Dow.

Q2. What is the primary objective of your research?

Our research with Kyung Hee University is focused on discovering and developing a novel type of emitting materials that have a unique mechanism of light emission, different from conventional emitting systems. The research will enable display panel companies to produce higher performance OLED panels with a lower production cost, when compared to current commercial materials. There are many technical issues to solve in order to develop this novel emitter system. The primary objective of our collaboration is to identify the key challenges of this new emitting system and explore solutions to those issues through a repeating process of computer modeling, design and synthesis of candidates, and device evaluation. Moreover, we are working with Dow Core R&D, which has strong R&D capabilities as well as high-tech equipment to develop this technology.

Q3. What will the impact of your research be?

Once this work is complete, Dow could provide an integrated solution of OLED. As mentioned above, this technology will enable the manufacture of large flat panel displays or lighting elements with better device efficiency and lifetime at a lower materials cost and capital investment, thereby feeding the growth of OLED market with diverse applications.

In addition, through this industrial-academic cooperation we anticipate great synergy from the exchange of ideas between Dow and Kyung Hee University, gaining further insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms of OLED materials.

Q4. What has the partnership achieved so far in 2015?

Computer modeling is an indispensable tool in predicting and selecting potential compounds, but the simulation could be misleading if proper parameters are not applied. Through many rounds of calculation using different sets of parameters, we successfully came up with a reliable and consistent computer modeling method that is now routinely used in this study. It was found to be comparable to the value from real measurements of energy structures and bulk properties.

In this novel type of emission, many factors contribute to overall performance of the device. In fact, we have been able to identify the key aspect that plays a critical role in enhancing device efficiency. This requirement was quantified by preparing OLED devices with many sets of compounds, and it showed an excellent correlation within the series of compounds tested up to now.

With reliable modeling tools and key parameters having been identified, we are set to complete the study of device optimization with candidate compounds and their analogues. The key point will be device performance that is not only comparable to conventional emitting systems, but also has other advantages such as lower material cost, IP initiative, etc.New OLED emitter research will continue to bring enhanced performance to drive the OLED display market. OLED display technology is a rapidly growing area, and has great potential for various applications in many display areas. Currently, more than 90% of OLED panels are used in mobile phone applications. However, these OLED panels will be used not only for large flat panel TVs, but also for flexible displays, wearable displays, wallpaper displays, automobile displays, and lighting. There is no limitation on developing OLED panels, which is why the market for OLED panels will gradually be expanded. These opportunities can be realized through collective efforts from both display panel companies and material suppliers such as Dow.

Q2. What is the primary objective of your research?

Our research with Kyung Hee University is focused on discovering and developing a novel type of emitting materials that have a unique mechanism of light emission, different from conventional emitting systems. The research will enable display panel companies to produce higher performance OLED panels with a lower production cost, when compared to current commercial materials. There are many technical issues to solve in order to develop this novel emitter system. The primary objective of our collaboration is to identify the key challenges of this new emitting system and explore solutions to those issues through a repeating process of computer modeling, design and synthesis of candidates, and device evaluation. Moreover, we are working with Dow Core R&D, which has strong R&D capabilities as well as high-tech equipment to develop this technology.

Q3. What will the impact of your research be?

Once this work is complete, Dow could provide an integrated solution of OLED. As mentioned above, this technology will enable the manufacture of large flat panel displays or lighting elements with better device efficiency and lifetime at a lower materials cost and capital investment, thereby feeding the growth of OLED market with diverse applications.

In addition, through this industrial-academic cooperation we anticipate great synergy from the exchange of ideas between Dow and Kyung Hee University, gaining further insight into the chemical and physical mechanisms of OLED materials.

Q4. What has the partnership achieved so far in 2015?

Computer modeling is an indispensable tool in predicting and selecting potential compounds, but the simulation could be misleading if proper parameters are not applied. Through many rounds of calculation using different sets of parameters, we successfully came up with a reliable and consistent computer modeling method that is now routinely used in this study. It was found to be comparable to the value from real measurements of energy structures and bulk properties.

In this novel type of emission, many factors contribute to overall performance of the device. In fact, we have been able to identify the key aspect that plays a critical role in enhancing device efficiency. This requirement was quantified by preparing OLED devices with many sets of compounds, and it showed an excellent correlation within the series of compounds tested up to now.

With reliable modeling tools and key parameters having been identified, we are set to complete the study of device optimization with candidate compounds and their analogues. The key point will be device performance that is not only comparable to conventional emitting systems, but also has other advantages such as lower material cost, IP initiative, etc.