Dow to Present on the Challenges for Materials at the 14th International System-on-Chip Conference

October 05,2016

As CMOS scaling has slowed, the call for innovative and complex system-on-chip (SoC) solutions has increased to achieve requirements that can’t be met by 28nm node devices. This requires even deeper technology understanding and strategic collaborative efforts. For the past 14 years, the International System-on-Chip Conference has provided a forum for industry experts and academia from around the world who design complex semiconductor ICs and IPs to gather and share information on this critical topic.

This year, the System-on-Chip Conference takes place Oct. 19 and 20 at the University of California, Irvine. Following the theme “Smart SoCs for a Smart World," presentations will address market drivers and trends, including the internet of things, and what’s needed to connect things like smart cities and smart cars. Solutions presented will come in the form of advances in SoC devices, as well as alternative approaches including 3D-ICs and packaging, 3D flash memory, SOI and more. The conference’s featured keynote speaker is Subramanian Iyer, Director of the Center for Heterogeneous Integration and Performance Scaling at UCLA, who will present a different approach to SoCs.

Dow Electronic Materials was invited to present on the challenges facing SoC manufacturing from the chemistry perspective. Matthew Grandbois, Ph.D., Corporate Account Market Manager, in his presentation titled “What ‘Moore’ is there? Challenges from the Chemistry Side of Semiconductor Fabrication,” will discuss how SoC devices have emerged to enable the continued evolution of electronic performance beyond what is achievable at 28nm, and Dow’s role in providing materials solutions for this challenging architectural landscape.

As a scientist within Dow’s core R&D organization, Grandbois developed numerous technologies and products for the automotive, agricultural and electronics industries. This work led him to his current area of expertise, which involves developing strategic technology and products for electronics manufacturing companies.

View conference abstracts and bios here.

As CMOS scaling has slowed, the call for innovative and complex system-on-chip (SoC) solutions has increased to achieve requirements that can’t be met by 28nm node devices. This requires even deeper technology understanding and strategic collaborative efforts. For the past 14 years, the International System-on-Chip Conference has provided a forum for industry experts and academia from around the world who design complex semiconductor ICs and IPs to gather and share information on this critical topic.

This year, the System-on-Chip Conference takes place Oct. 19 and 20 at the University of California, Irvine. Following the theme “Smart SoCs for a Smart World," presentations will address market drivers and trends, including the internet of things, and what’s needed to connect things like smart cities and smart cars. Solutions presented will come in the form of advances in SoC devices, as well as alternative approaches including 3D-ICs and packaging, 3D flash memory, SOI and more. The conference’s featured keynote speaker is Subramanian Iyer, Director of the Center for Heterogeneous Integration and Performance Scaling at UCLA, who will present a different approach to SoCs.

Dow Electronic Materials was invited to present on the challenges facing SoC manufacturing from the chemistry perspective. Matthew Grandbois, Ph.D., Corporate Account Market Manager, in his presentation titled “What ‘Moore’ is there? Challenges from the Chemistry Side of Semiconductor Fabrication,” will discuss how SoC devices have emerged to enable the continued evolution of electronic performance beyond what is achievable at 28nm, and Dow’s role in providing materials solutions for this challenging architectural landscape.

As a scientist within Dow’s core R&D organization, Grandbois developed numerous technologies and products for the automotive, agricultural and electronics industries. This work led him to his current area of expertise, which involves developing strategic technology and products for electronics manufacturing companies.

View conference abstracts and bios here.