Does Electrodeposited Indium have a Future in Advanced Packaging?

May 04,2016

Dow Electronic Materials will participate in an interactive presentation at the annual IEEE Electronic Components and Technology Conference (ECTC) taking place May 31 – June 3, 2016 in Las Vegas, NV. The ECTC is the premier international event that brings together the best scientists and engineers working in packaging, components, and microelectronic systems technology in an environment of cooperation and technical exchange. ECTC is sponsored by the Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology (CPMT) Society of the IEEE.

Dow Electronic Materials will participate in an interactive presentation at the annual IEEE Electronic Components and Technology Conference (ECTC) taking place May 31 – June 3, 2016 in Las Vegas, NV. The ECTC is the premier international event that brings together the best scientists and engineers working in packaging, components, and microelectronic systems technology in an environment of cooperation and technical exchange. ECTC is sponsored by the Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology (CPMT) Society of the IEEE.

At ECTC, Dow Electronic Materials will present on “Enabling Low-Temperature Bonding in Advanced Packaging using Electrodeposited Indium,” which explores best practices in integrating this important electronic material into high-reliability advanced packages.

Thursday, June 02, 2016
Session 39: Interactive Presentations 3: 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Enabling Low-Temperature Bonding in Advanced Packaging using Electrodeposited Indium
Yi Qin, Kristen Flajslik, Brandon Sherzer, Emily Banelis*, Inho Lee, Regina Cho, Louis Grippo, Masaaki Imanari, Mark Lefebvre, Lingyun Wei, Wataru Tachikawa, Jianwei Dong, Jeffrey Calvert Dow Electronic Materials, Marlborough MA, USA,

Packaging has become one of the fastest growing segments in the semiconductor industry, and lead-free soldering is one of the most critical steps in interconnection at the packaging level. The evolution of packaging requirements for various devices is driving changes in lead-free solder material selection, with lower melting point being an emerging criterion. Indium—because of its unique properties such as high thermal and electrical conductivity, excellent ductility, and particularly the low melting point of 157°C along with the capability of alloying with other metals (e.g. tin) to bring the melting point further down—is drawing increasing attention to its application in packaging, as a candidate for low temperature solders. In the current study, indium capping on standard and micro copper pillars was demonstrated. It was also shown that stacking indium and tin layers could form (near) eutectic indium-tin alloys after reflow with a melting point as low as 119°C. The experimental next-generation indium electroplating chemistry demonstrated a smoother surface morphology compared to the current generation chemistry, in support of demanding requirements for future packaging applications.