Addressing Challenges to Enhance OLED Device Performance

July 07,2015

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) device performance has progressed substantially in recent years, resulting in increased adoption with a variety of electronic devices currently using this display technology. However, challenges remain that must be solved—such as further optimizing lifetime and efficiency—for OLEDs to reach their true potential and experience adoption in new applications.

Manipulating device performance has historically been achieved by changing the underlying chemical structures or device stack architectures. However, recent work has explored modifying the way molecules pack in the glass film during deposition from the gas phase. This approach may offer a new tool for enhancing device performance through molecular orientation. This is because the deposition process can result in films where the molecular axis of the glass material is preferentially ordered to lie parallel to the plane of the substrate.

In the paper, “Molecular Orientation, Thermal Behavior and Density of Electron and Hole Transport Layers and the Implication on Device Performance for OLEDs,” presented at SPIE’s 2014 Organic Light Emitting Materials and Devices XVIII conference, we explore how materials made within Dow’s Electronic Materials business showed enhanced performance when the orientation of the molecules, as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, was oriented in a more parallel fashion as compared with other materials. We discuss the effect of anisotropy on device performance for several charge transport layers, including investigating hole and electron transport materials. Finally, correlations between device performance and material properties were made; and a statistically significant correlation was observed between anisotropy and device lifetime.

Read the paper

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) device performance has progressed substantially in recent years, resulting in increased adoption with a variety of electronic devices currently using this display technology. However, challenges remain that must be solved—such as further optimizing lifetime and efficiency—for OLEDs to reach their true potential and experience adoption in new applications.

Manipulating device performance has historically been achieved by changing the underlying chemical structures or device stack architectures. However, recent work has explored modifying the way molecules pack in the glass film during deposition from the gas phase. This approach may offer a new tool for enhancing device performance through molecular orientation. This is because the deposition process can result in films where the molecular axis of the glass material is preferentially ordered to lie parallel to the plane of the substrate.

In the paper, “Molecular Orientation, Thermal Behavior and Density of Electron and Hole Transport Layers and the Implication on Device Performance for OLEDs,” presented at SPIE’s 2014 Organic Light Emitting Materials and Devices XVIII conference, we explore how materials made within Dow’s Electronic Materials business showed enhanced performance when the orientation of the molecules, as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, was oriented in a more parallel fashion as compared with other materials. We discuss the effect of anisotropy on device performance for several charge transport layers, including investigating hole and electron transport materials. Finally, correlations between device performance and material properties were made; and a statistically significant correlation was observed between anisotropy and device lifetime.

Read the paper