DuPont Microcircuit Materials Introduces Pure Copper Conductive Ink

Offers More Cost-effective Design Flexibility for Today’s Printed Electronics

Research Triangle Park, N.C., Nov. 14, 2014 – DuPont Microcircuit Materials (DuPont) is introducing its first pure copper conductive ink for photonic curing, DuPont™ PE510 copper conductor.  DuPont™ PE510 is a cost-effective alternative to silver conductor inks for a variety of possible applications and is the newest product in a suite of conductive ink materials specifically tailored for use in certain types of antenna, membrane touch switch (MTS), radio-frequency identification (RFID), and consumer electronic applications.  DuPont will highlight the newest offerings from its expanding portfolio and deliver two key technical presentations at the upcoming Printed Electronics USA 2014, Nov. 19 – 20 in Santa Clara, Calif., at booth E16.

“DuPont tailored this new pure copper conductive ink to allow our customers greater flexibility in design – it enables conductivity on various types of substrates, while better managing costs,” said Steven Willoughby, marketing manager, DuPont Microcircuit Materials.  “This combination of strengths can unfold some unique opportunities in the printed electronics market.”

DuPont™ PE510 copper conductor provides a means to rapidly process low-lamp-voltage copper metallization circuit designs on a wide range of plastic substrates including FR-4, PVC, polyimide films such as DuPont™ Kapton®, and PET.  It can be processed using high-speed photonic curing equipment and provides a long lamp life, as well as superior adhesion and processing.  Additional benefits include excellent printed line and space resolution.  DuPont™PE510 can be used for a variety of consumer electronic applications and offers manufacturers design flexibility due to the wide range of substrates with which it is compatible.

During Printed Electronics USA 2014, DuPont will demonstrate the capabilities of its high-performance inks in antenna applications.  DuPont silver and copper conductive inks allow antenna designers more flexibility and enable a lower total manufacturing cost, while meeting the electrical performance requirements for a wide range of antenna applications.

DuPont will deliver a presentation on Nov. 20 titled “Printed Wearables: Functional Inks for the Wearable World,” as well as teach a master class session on Nov. 18 titled “Conductive Inks, Film and Transparent Conductive Film.”  DuPont will be exhibiting at the booth E16 location.

DuPont Teijin Films also will be exhibiting at the booth E16 location.

DuPont Microcircuit Materials (MCM) is an established high-volume supplier of electronic inks and pastes that offers a broad range of printed electronic materials commercially available today. This growing range of DuPont MCM electronic inks is used in applications such as forming conductive traces, capacitor and resistor elements, and dielectric and encapsulating layers that are compatible with many substrate surfaces including polyester, glass and ceramic.  MCM has over 40 years of experience in the development, manufacture, sale and support of specialized thick film compositions for a variety of electronic applications in the automotive, display, photovoltaic, biomedical, industrial, military and telecommunications markets.  For more information on DuPont Microcircuit Materials, visit http://mcm.dupont.com.

DuPont (NYSE: DD) has been bringing world-class science and engineering to the global marketplace in the form of innovative products, materials, and services since 1802.  The company believes that by collaborating with customers, governments, NGOs, and thought leaders we can help find solutions to such global challenges as providing enough healthy food for people everywhere, decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, and protecting life and the environment.  For additional information about DuPont and its commitment to inclusive innovation, please visit http://www.dupont.com.

 

DuPont PE510 Copper Conductor offers cost-effective design flexibility for Printed Electronics